Outback

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Outback

The Outback is the vast, remote, arid area of Australia. The term “the outback” is generally used to refer to locations that are comparatively more remote than those areas named “the bush” which, colloquially, can refer to any lands outside the main urban areas.

Early European exploration of inland Australia was sporadic. More focus was on the more accessible and fertile coastal areas. The first party to successfully cross the Blue Mountains just outside Sydney was led by Gregory Blaxland in 1813, 25 years after the colony was established. People starting with John Oxley in 1817, 1818 and 1821, followed by Charles Sturt in 1829-1830 attempted to follow the westward-flowing rivers to find an “inland sea”, but these were found to all flow into the Murray River and Darling River which turn south. Over the period 1858 to 1861, John McDouall Stuart led six expeditions north from Adelaide into the outback, culminating in successfully reaching the north coast of Australia and returning, without the loss of any of the party’s members’ lives. This contrasts with the ill-fated Burke and Wills expedition in 1860ñ61 which was much better funded, but resulted in the deaths of three of the members of the transcontinental party.

Outback

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